Japanese Events in London

Submissions welcome! Japan-related event in London to add? Just click the green ‘+ Post Your Event’ button. It’s free, & easy to do.

Aug
22
Thu
2019
EXHIBITION: Anno’s Journey: the World of Anno Mitsumasa @ Japan House, London
Aug 22 – Oct 27 all-day

Image: © Anno Mitsumasa. Courtesy of Anno Art Museum.

Anno’s Journey: the World of Anno Mitsumasa Exhibition at Japan House London

This exhibition explores the work of Anno Mitsumasa, one of Japan’s greatest children’s book illustrators and authors, who is best known for his picture books, with few or no words, published from the late 1960s onwards. The display illustrates the story of Anno Mitsumasa’s life and creative journey, features a reading library with many of Anno’s 300 published books, introduces Japanese language for children and beginners, and explores Anno’s remarkably varied work.

Additionally, the Embassy of Japan will host a more extensive exhibition of Anno’s landscape paintings in August-September.

Admission Free

*Opening hours may vary depending on events, so please check our website on the day of your visit

Sep
5
Thu
2019
Erika Kobayashi: His Last Bow @ Yamamoto Keiko Rochaix
Sep 5 – Nov 21 all-day

Erika Kobayashi “In My Hand— The Fire of Prometheus”, 2019

The first showing of the Japanese artist Erika Kobayashi in the UK. The exhibition explores her family history strangely intertwined with the discovery of uranium, radioactivation, invention of atomic bomb, and Sherlock Holmes.

Erika Kobayashi is a singular artist: she moves seamlessly to and from a wide range of media for her creation; manga, novels and visual art, always with strong messages to convey. The themes across her media of choice stay constant — things that are invisible, time, history, family, memory, and traces of places — but she treats the core concept with distinctive approaches for each medium in ways that can be only done with that particular medium. A natural story teller, in manga and novel the artist builds the case with layers and webs of relatable anecdotes, often conjuring up space and time, slowly drawing in the readers and makes the point. In visual art Kobayashi is more direct, almost confronting audience with bold images that lay out the issues in front of them and ask questions; it is all about the power of image.

Curated by Hikotaro Kanehira, the upcoming exhibition comprises photographies, short video, drawings and other materials that feature short stories. But again, it is the eclectic mix of media and unusual combination of photographic and video images, figurative drawings and verses, that construct Kobayashi’s unparalleled universe that is also a peculiar amalgam of what are loosely defined as ‘art’ and a wide scope of popular culture, which may be a mirror image of what we are in today’s world.

Image:

Erika Kobayashi “In My Hand— The Fire of Prometheus”, 2019 C-print 43.2cmx35.6cm © Erika Kobayashi, Courtesy Yutaka Kikutake Gallery, Photo: Kasane Nogawa

Erika Kobayashi (b.1978, Tokyo)

lives and works in Tokyo.

Recent solo exhibitions: “1F in the Forest of Wild Birds” Yutaka Kikutake Gallery, Tokyo (2019), “Trinity” Karuizawa New Art Museum, Nagano (2017). Group exhibitions include: “Image Narratives: Literature in Japanese Contemporary Art” The National Art Center, Tokyo (2019), “Women Imagining Rooms: About the Diary of Lady Sarashina” Ichihara Lakeside Museum, Chiba (2019), “Roppongi Crossing 2016: My Body, Your Voice,” Mori Art Museum, Tokyo (2016); “Living Locally –Reconsidering Critical Regionalism,” ARTS MAEBASHI (2015), “Your Dear Kitty, the book of Memories,” collaboration with The Future, Lloyd Hotel and JCC, Amsterdam (2015), and “The Radiants,” Bortolami Gallery, New York (2015). Residency with the Asian Cultural Council, NYC (2007-2008).

Nominated for the major literature awards including Mishima Yukio Award and Akutagawa Award both in 2014 for her novel “Breakfast with Madame Curie”. Other publications include: “Hikari no kodomo LUMINOUS (Children of Light: Luminous)” volume 1 and 2, (2013 and 2016) “Your Dear Kitty” (2011).

Kobayashi’s father is a psychiatrist and a Sherlockian, Tsukasa Kobayashi.

Click here for the artist website.

Yamamoto Keiko Rochaix
19 Goulston St, London, E1 7TP
Visit the website

Oct
3
Thu
2019
The Post-Anthropocene by Naoya Inose @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Oct 3 @ 9:30 am – Nov 1 @ 5:00 pm
The Post-Anthropocene by Naoya Inose @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation is delighted to introduce the London-based Japanese artist Naoya Inose to the UK public.

The new geological era the Anthropocene, which means “the age of humanity”, defines the epoch we live in, and it is a time of significant human impact on Earth’s geology, ecosystem and climate. What kind of influence will humanity bring to this new geological age? Is the age of humanity in fact the history of time itself?

The main work in this exhibition, Ave Maria, depicts a Ferris wheel quietly enshrined in a huge cave. This Ferris wheel left by humans is a metaphor of humanity itself and it slowly rotates, climbing up and plunging down from top to bottom. Indeed, the Ferris wheel embodies the time constraints by which humanity is bound; it just constantly repeats its circular movement.

If life and death are the motif of the Ferris wheel, the Ferris wheel in the work Ave Maria has stopped, and time restrictions no longer exist. It has become an onlooker that quietly stares out of the cave. It is as if it is expecting slowly to become part of nature without being exposed to the sunshine.

Oct
14
Mon
2019
The Japan Society Book Club @ The Japan Society
Oct 14 @ 7:00 pm

apan Society Book Club 2018Join us on the second Monday of each month for the Japan Society Book Club. The intention is simple: to explore the themes of the book, express personal opinions on the style and content, discuss how the book has changed (or not) in translation and to have a relaxed discussion with others who have similar interests.

There is no restriction on the nationality of the authors read, but books should be available in translation in both Japanese and English. The discussion is conducted mainly in English, but you can choose the language in which you read the book.

Visit the website to see which book will be the focus each month.

Booking Information

Please contact the Japan Society office on tel: 020 3075 1996 or email: events@japansociety.org.uk to book a place on any of our events. When emailing, please include the event title in the subject line.
Alternatively you can book online via our online booking form.

Oct
19
Sat
2019
Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival ABERYSTWYTH @ Aberystwyth Arts Centre, Aberystwyth, Wales
Oct 19 – Oct 20 all-day

‘This year’s Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival continues at Aberystwyth Arts Centre, on the 19th -20th October, and we are hard at work organising everything to ensure that you will have a fantastic time. We are coordinating our marketplace to get the tables ready and preparing to welcome our special guests, Takeshi Yashiro and Satoshi Akutsu, who will be travelling from Japan to the UK to deliver their masterclass and animation workshop. Don’t miss out – book your tickets today.’

Nov
1
Fri
2019
Yū (Shin’ichi Isohata / Naoyo Yakushi / Misuzu) @ CAFE OTO
Nov 1 @ 7:30 pm

Yū (Shin’ichi Isohata – Naoyo Yakushi – Misuzu)

“This project is named Yū (幽) / phantom.

Yū is Japanese special sensitivity, it’s means like “faintly”, “fleeting”, “airy”, “vaguely”. It’s be understood by Japanese people as also “ghost”, “apparition”, “phantom”.

This performance depicts two Japanese goddesses, one phantom, and one modern woman, by dance of Misuzu and the music of Shin’ichi Isohata and Naoyo Yakushi.

Many of the origins of religion in all world were goddess faith. God or monster has the back and front faces that are intrinsic as same as humans (although I think originally God should not be such an existence..). Every existences have good and evil, and also there has sadness in the bottom of the heart. However, sometime the sadness might be become to mercy or hope. Music wander between reality and mythology with abstract, minimal sound, and Japan sensitivities etc… for realizing the true happiness in heart.” – Shin’ichi Isohata

Nov
7
Thu
2019
Cosmogenesis by Hiroe Saeki @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Nov 7 2019 – Jan 31 2020 all-day
Cosmogenesis by Hiroe Saeki @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation is delighted to host Hiroe Saeki’s first UK solo show.

Hiroe Saeki’s work inhabits a liminal zone on the edges of the perceivable: monochromatic explorations of the subject of beauty in nature, delicate drawings with a weightless quality, sparse compositions evoking traditional aesthetics. Like a photograph, the totality of the artwork and the detail are valued equally.

The void is inherent in her work, allowing the microscopic and macroscopic viewpoint to coexist. Thus her chosen tool is the pencil: ephemeral because it can be erased, fluid because it is undefined, emancipating because there is no outline to follow.

In this exhibition, she presents a new body of work with graphite and water. The powdered graphite travels through capillaries of water: settling where and when the water evaporates, to be absorbed by the land of paper. The resulting surfaces recall water-carved planetary landscapes.

Saeki’s practice evokes associations with biological or mineral forms, such as geological sediments. Exquisite, miniscule lines take us to the nano level of the cellular structure of organisms. Combined with the serendipitous nature of her new graphite process, they take on a sense of the cosmic. This new work coalesces her vision of the world into a yearning to interconnect with the universe at all its scales.

Admission free

Monday – Friday 9.30AM – 5PM

Hiroe Saeki (b. 1978, Osaka) currently lives and works in Berlin. Notable exhibitions include: Abstract and Empathy, Pola Museum, Tokyo 2019; Visions of Exchange: Daimler Contemporary, Berlin 2018; It’s Our Permanent Collection!, Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo 2016; Now Japan, Kunsthal KAdE, Amersfoort 2013 and the 242nd Summer Exhibition, Royal Academy of Arts, London 2010. Awarded Grants include: POLA Art Foundation Program of Overseas Study 2014; Daimler Foundation, Artist-in-residence Berlin 2010 and The VOCA Encouragement Prize in 2006. Collections: MoMA, New York; The Daimler Art Collection; Deutsche Bank; Doron Sebbag; Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo; Miniature Museum (Netherlands); Toyota Art Collection; The UBS Art Collection.

Image credits: Untitled 2019, Pencil and graphite and acrylic and acrylic ink and Japanese ink on paper, 39x54cm © Hiroe Saeki

Private View: Cosmogenesis by Hiroe Saeki @ The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Nov 7 all-day
Private View: Cosmogenesis by Hiroe Saeki @ The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

The Private View is a chance to have a first look at the exhibition Cosmogenesis by the Berlin-based Japanese artist Hiroe Saeki.

Hiroe Saeki’s work inhabits a liminal zone on the edges of the perceivable: monochromatic explorations of the subject of beauty in nature, delicate drawings with a weightless quality, sparse compositions evoking traditional aesthetics. Like a photograph, the totality of the artwork and the detail are valued equally.

The void is inherent in her work, allowing the microscopic and macroscopic viewpoint to coexist. Thus her chosen tool is the pencil: ephemeral because it can be erased, fluid because it is undefined, emancipating because there is no outline to follow.

In this exhibition, she presents a new body of work with graphite and water. The powdered graphite travels through capillaries of water: settling where and when the water evaporates, to be absorbed by the land of paper. The resulting surfaces recall water-carved planetary landscapes.

Saeki’s practice evokes associations with biological or mineral forms, such as geological sediments. Exquisite, miniscule lines take us to the nano level of the cellular structure of organisms. Combined with the serendipitous nature of her new graphite process, they take on a sense of the cosmic. This new work coalesces her vision of the world into a yearning to interconnect with the universe at all its scales.

Nov
11
Mon
2019
Minyo Crusaders @ The Jazz Cafe
Nov 11 @ 7:00 pm

Minyo Crusaders rework traditional Japanese folk songs (minyō) with Latin, African and Caribbean rhythms to create some of the most infectious music anywhere between Latin America and Japan. The punchy and inventive arrangements of this ten-piece big band seamlessly blend Afro-Cuban and Caribbean rhythms with old Japanese minyōto create a compellingly modern sound. Since label Mais Um released the band’s debut album Echoes of Japan in April the acclaim has been universal.

The band’s sound could be described as having a retro Japanese feel influenced by a a hefty dose of worldwide music. Otemoyan, a well-known folk song from southern Kumamoto Prefecture about a young maiden marrying a man with a pockmarked face, is reshaped into a reggae track with dub sensibilities. Akita Nikata Bushi from northern Akita Prefecture takes its cue from Ethiopian funk, while Fukuoka Prefecture’s Tanko Bushi swings to the sound of boogaloo. All the while, however, minyō’s distinctive stylised form of singing is maintained, providing a sense of authenticity despite the melange of rhythms.

For more information visit: www.comono.co.uk/live/minyo-crusaders/

 

The Japan Society Book Club @ The Japan Society
Nov 11 @ 7:00 pm

apan Society Book Club 2018Join us on the second Monday of each month for the Japan Society Book Club. The intention is simple: to explore the themes of the book, express personal opinions on the style and content, discuss how the book has changed (or not) in translation and to have a relaxed discussion with others who have similar interests.

There is no restriction on the nationality of the authors read, but books should be available in translation in both Japanese and English. The discussion is conducted mainly in English, but you can choose the language in which you read the book.

Visit the website to see which book will be the focus each month.

Booking Information

Please contact the Japan Society office on tel: 020 3075 1996 or email: events@japansociety.org.uk to book a place on any of our events. When emailing, please include the event title in the subject line.
Alternatively you can book online via our online booking form.