Japanese Events in London

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Nov
6
Tue
2018
Private View: Jailhouse Locke by Tsuyoshi Anzai @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Nov 6 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Private View: Jailhouse Locke by Tsuyoshi Anzai @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

The works presented in Tsuyoshi Anzai’s first solo exhibition in the UK pose questions about the ‘thereness’ of everyday items.
Taking inspiration from the Platonic philosophical assumption of a world of ideas which is hidden from human senses, Anzai attempts to disrupt the way we unconsciously and passively perceive “representation”, by creating a state where the object is suspended somewhere between reality and illusion.

In the series of works ‘distance’ (2016- ), a device invented by Anzai, called ‘New Video Player’, enables viewers to see an object as an illusory video image, although the object is in fact in front of them. Using the mechanism of a camera obscura, this box-like device projects an image of 3D objects onto a screen through a lens. The device produces moving images in a way that is completely different from conventional video-recording devices, since the subject itself, namely the kinetic sculpture, is moving inside the device.
Etymologically referring to the ancient Greek word kinesis (motion), kinetics started being applied to art at the end of the 19th century, by impressionist artists seeking a more rounded representation of the human figure through the use of perspective. In the 20th century, the concept of movement was then applied to objects and three dimensional works.

Intending to put under scrutiny the dualism between representation and interpretation, in the paintings ‘TBD’, inspired by everyday items, Anzai removes the illustrated objects from any context and leaves the viewer free to focus on their pure form.

The chasm between the objective and the subjective also inspired the title of the exhibition, where the term “Jailhouse” alludes to the prisoners of Plato’s Cave, and “Locke” refers to the philosopher John Locke, one of the founders of Empiricism, a philosophical movement which asserts that our knowledge can be acquired only from what we perceive through our senses.
Additionally, the title contains a veiled pun, referencing the Jailhouse Rock song by Elvis Priestley. As with the rocker’ famous dance moves, the movements of Anzai’s kinetic sculptures capture the viewer with their impermanent choreographies.

Breaking free of what the artist defines as the “modern disease of the subject/object distinction created by Descartes”, Anzai’s works challenge the visitors to look beyond simplifications and into the intertwined complexities of our modern world.

Image: distance #003-5, 2017, Installation View at the Pohang Museum of Steel Art, Pohang, South Korea © Tsuyoshi Anzai

Address:
Daiwa Foundation Japan House
13/14 Cornwall Terrace
London NW1 4QP
Nearest Tube: Baker Street

Nov
15
Thu
2018
Tsuyoshi Anzai in conversation with Dr Dean Kenning @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Nov 15 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Tsuyoshi Anzai in conversation with Dr Dean Kenning @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

Event part of the exhibition: Jailhouse Locke by Tsuyoshi Anzai
7 November-5 December 2018, Monday–Friday 9.30am–5pm, Admission free

Private View: Tuesday 6 November 2018, 6-8pm Admission free, booking essential

On the occasion of his artist talk, Tsuyoshi Anzai will discuss his ‘Jailhouse Locke’ exhibition with Dr Dean Kenning, Lecturer at Central Saint Martins and Research Fellow at Kingston School of Art.
Anzai’s works pose questions about the “thereness” of everyday items; the title of the show takes inspiration from a wide range of philosophical ideas- most importantly, the prisoners of Plato’s Cave and the founder of empiricism John Locke- that prompted Anzai to investigate and disrupt the way we unconsciously and passively perceive “representation”.
For example, in the series of works ‘distance’ (2016- ), Anzai created a devices that, using the mechanism of a camera obscura, enables viewers to see an object as an illusory video image, although the object is in fact in front of them. The artist’s intention, to put under scrutiny the dualism between representation and interpretation, is also explored in the paintings ‘TBD’, where Anzai removes the illustrated objects from any context, leaving the viewer free to focus on their pure form.
During the talk, the artist will present his creative process, and how he started building simple-structured machines with unusual combinations of everyday items, with the intent of redefining the connection between their form/purpose when they are used as components of machines.
Breaking free of what the artist defines as the “modern disease of the subject/object distinction created by Descartes”, Anzai’s works challenge the visitors to look beyond simplifications and into the intertwined complexities of our modern world.
Speakers:

Tsuyoshi Anzai (b.1987) specializes in kinetic art and video. He creates simple-structured machines by making impromptu combinations of everyday items, exploring the relationships between humans and objects. He received a Bachelor in Music in 2009 and a Master in Film and New Media in 2011, both from Tokyo University of the Arts. He participated in the artist residency program at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston from 2015 to 2017. Anzai has had several solo exhibitions, including Shadows Cast Shadows (2018), Plaza North, Saitama, Japan; Origins Originated from Originative Originals (2014), Chimera-Project, Budapest, Hungary. Anzai’s work has also been included in group shows in Korea, United States and in his native Japan, for example at the Kawasaki City Museum.
Anzai won a Bursary Award from the Royal Society of Sculptors in 2015.

Dr Dean Kenning is an artist and writer. Dean is currently Research Fellow at Kingston School of Art and teaches Fine Art at Central St Martins. He is also a member of the Capital Drawing Group and the Social Morphology Research Unit. Dean’s artworks range from kinetic sculptures to videos and diagrams, often employing DIY and autodidactic methods and modes of representation to express compulsive states and to explore political and philosophical material. His most recent solo exhibition was at Piper Keys (2018) and he has exhibited internationally in group shows including at the ICA (2015), Greene Naftali (2017) and BAK (2013). He has also published articles in journals such as Third Text, Art Monthly and Mute, including on the politics of art and art education.

Image: distance, 2018, Installation View from “Shadows Cast Shadows”, Plaza North, Saitama, Japan
© Tsuyoshi Anzai

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Daiwa Foundation Japan House
13/14 Cornwall Terrace (Outer Circle)
London NW1 4QP

Nov
17
Sat
2018
Experience Japan Exhibition 2018 @ The Royal Society London
Nov 17 all-day
Experience Japan Exhibition 2018 @ The Royal Society London | England | United Kingdom

The Experience Japan Exhibition aims to introduce the growing range of study and research opportunities available in Japan.

This year,12 Japanese education institutions and several Japan-related organisations will be attending to provide information on degree programmes taught entirely in English, as well as on the research opportunities, summer courses and other options open to international students. There will also be a chance to find out about the variety of scholarships and research funding available to enable you to take advantage of these learning opportunities.

This year’s line-up of seminars will cover the basics about local life, as well as allow you to hear directly from individuals who have experienced studying or conducting research in Japan. Guest speakers will be delivering presentations that provide insights into Japanese language, as well as showcasing Japanese innovation. There will also be a special seminar on the ever-popular Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Programme.

So come along and find your way to Japan – the experience of a lifetime awaits!

Online registration is recommended but not required. Pre-register via the link below to receive a special gift on the day of the exhibition.

Experience Japan Exhibition Website
http://www.experience-japan.jp/

Mar
12
Tue
2019
Yamato – Passion @ The Peacock
Mar 12 – Mar 31 all-day
Yamato - Passion @ The Peacock | England | United Kingdom

As the Japanese taiko drumming troupe make their way back to London, they bring with them the Odaiko drums. These traditional drums, used in Shinto rituals, weigh over half a tonne each, and require exceptional skill and physicality to produce each floor-shaking note.

Dedicated to their art, the Yamato drummers train ferociously. On stage, they display a staggering strength, using their entire bodies to play and share with their audiences an intense passion that comes out in their pounding, high-energy and thrillingly thunderous performances.

“Primal, exhilarating; you want to do it too”

THE TIMES on Chousensha – The Challengers

Apr
17
Wed
2019
JIZAI by Haruo Mitsuta @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Apr 17 @ 9:30 am – May 14 @ 5:00 pm
JIZAI by Haruo Mitsuta @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation is delighted to introduce the unique works of the acclaimed Japanese artist Haruo Mitsuta to the UK public.

Mitsuta is the only contemporary artist who makes Jizai Okimono (“articulated animals”) – flexible animal figures made from metal pieces, which can replicate the movements of the original animals. Originally they were made by armourers in the late Edo and the Meiji period.

Jizai Okimono have gained some recognition within Japan in recent years, but still belong to a very minor area of traditional Japanese metallic handicrafts. The vast majority of these items were sold abroad, so this exceptional form of art never had the chance to develop its roots within Japan, where it originated. Its presence may have been long lost in the Japanese art scene, but these objects have been collected and cherished by many people outside Japan.

Mitsuta will be showcasing some of his most impressive and startlingly realistic pieces in this exhibition.

Jul
25
Thu
2019
Sushi Girls @ Theatro Technis, NW1 1TT
Jul 25 @ 7:00 pm – Jul 27 @ 5:00 pm

Comedy about two Japanese girls who come to London to study English. Back-breaking stuff for their host family which has to bow to their every needs.

Aug
7
Wed
2019
Ainu Othello @ TARA Arts
Aug 7 @ 7:30 pm – Aug 10 @ 9:00 pm

Ainu Othello at TARA ARTSSHAKESPEARE’S MASTERPIECE GETS A POWERFUL JAPANESE REVIVAL

It is 1860, in the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido. Othello is an Ainu, one of the indigenous people of northern Japan. He falls in love with a Japanese woman and is betrayed by a friend (Iago) of mixed Ainu and Japanese heritage.

Lies, manipulation and discrimination are the steadfast roots of jealousy in this epic performance of Shakespeare’s classic tragedy.

Ainu Othello is adapted by Kazumi Shimodate, Artistic Director of The Shakespeare Company Japan.

Co-directed by Kazumi Shimodate and Ainu theatre director Debo Akibe, this spectacular production has been staged in Sendai, Tokyo, and Sapporo, opening powerful discussions about discrimination faced by the Ainu, and the prospects for new relationships in the modern era. Each performance will be preceded by a presentation from the Dance Group Piricap.

Ainu Othello is a rare opportunity to see how Shakespeare remains a contemporary chronicler of human prejudices in another part of the globe.

Performed in Japanese

Aug
10
Sat
2019
Teach 1-to-1 English in Japan *August 2019 UK Recruiting Event* @ TBD
Aug 10 all-day
Teach 1-to-1 English in Japan *August 2019 UK Recruiting Event* @ TBD

Looking to experience something new in 2019? Why not try teaching English in Japan?
Gaba Corporation is the leading one-to-one English language school in Japan, with 44 locations spread across the major cities. Instructors have the benefit of a flexible schedule which they design monthly, with no minimum or maximum number of lessons needing to be taught each month. Our clients are motivated adults with varying goals and interests, and there is a large focus on development for Instructors in the form of different workshops and mentorship. Career opportunities are also available. Teaching English in Japan with Gaba is a great opportunity to live in the exciting culture of Japan and gain some valuable professional experience at the same time.
We are looking for applicants who possess the following:
• Solid people skills
• Good command of the English language
• Ability to work independently
• Desire to live and work in Japan
• TEFL/ TESOL certification or ESL experience preferred
Testimonials from current instructors available to watch at our website.
If you are living in or near any of the following locations, please come along to one of our Information Seminars in August 2019 to meet a recruiter and learn more about Gaba:
• Manchester – August 8th (evening)
• London – August 10th (daytime)
If you are not able to attend our Recruiting Event, you may still apply for a position to come to Japan to teach with GABA through our website.

Aug
23
Fri
2019
Origami Soundscapes X The Crane @ Arcola Theatre
Aug 23 – Aug 24 all-day
Origami Soundscapes X The Crane @ Arcola Theatre

Grimeborn Opera Festival

8pm 23rd August
3pm 24th August
8pm 24th August

Origami and music. A multi-media opera installation. Verity Lane‘s two-part project draws on her 10 years’ experience of living in Japan, exploring classical Japanese traditions with a uniquely avant-garde twist.

A brand-new performance project with music, stories and concept by Verity Lane, Origami Soundscapes: Flower, Bird, Wind & Moon explores ancient symbolism and Japanese birdsong, featuring a large-scale origami performance by Coco Sato, percussion, shakuhachi and storytelling.

The Crane reimagines a Japanese folk story about a magical crane that takes human form, set around Hokkaido’s Otowa Bridge. This mystical opera installation explores traditional Japanese aesthetics through a blend of Noh theatre conventions, traditional and contemporary dance, avant-garde music and animation.

Sung in English and Japanese without surtitles.

Music and Libretto (English and Japanese) by Verity Lane

Supported by Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation

https://www.facebook.com/events/342669456446524/

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Verity Lane/music, words, creative directer
Coco Sato/Giant Origami
Beibei Wang/Percussion
Mirei Yazawa/Dance
Tomoko Komura/Voice
Hester Dart/Voice
Kiku Day/Shakuhachi
Rowan O’Brien/Animator

****************************
Verity Lane
Born in Tottenham and spending nearly a decade in Japan, visual artist, composer and writer Verity Lane specialises in creating highly visual performance installations for traditional Japanese instruments. and beyond.
Her recent multi-media projects include A Thousand Bamboo in a Dancing Wind (performance installation for 300 shakuhachi, 2 dancers, projection and performance poetry, commissioned by The World Shakuhachi Festival, held at Goldsmiths, 2018), Yugenism: Animated Soundscapes of the Japanese Sublime (supported by Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation and Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation), and Japanese Sandscapes: The Tale of Mt Fuji where she worked with artists including Ko Ishikawa (sho/Reigakusha), Etsuko Takezawa (koto/shamisen) and Kaho Aso (traditional Japanese dance/kotsuzumi). Both projects saw Lane launch herself within London’s avant garde music scene, selling out venues across London.
https://www.facebook.com/pg/veritycomposer/

Coco Sato is an award-winning Japanese artist based in the UK. Her work uses origami to change the way people see the world.
https://www.facebook.com/GiantOrigami/

Mirei Yazawa is a performance artist based in London.

Beibei Wang is a genre defying percussionist based in London.
https://www.facebook.com/beibeiwangmusic/

Tomoko Komura is a London based performer from Japan, trained at the London International School of Performing Arts with an MFA in Lecoq-based Actor-Created Theatre (2006). She has performed and toured in shows by award-winning theatre companies such as Theatre Ad Infinitum (Ballad of the Burning Star), Theatre Témoin (Jukai) and Out of Chaos (Out of Chaos).

Kiku Day is a shakuhachi player based in Denmark.
http://www.kikuday.com/

Hester Dart is a London based contralto and graduate from the University of Leeds. They study with Prof. Neil Baker and are currently finishing their second year at the Morley College Opera School. Hester is particularly interested in promoting the work of
LGBTQ+ composers and musicians. They would like to contribute towards a more inclusive and accessible environment within classical music and opera.

Rowan O’Brien is a renowned animator and 3D artist from the West Coast of Ireland. He mixes sketches, objects, computer animation, and video in his work. He has screened and exhibited work across Europe, South Korea and Japan, where he lived and studied Japanese fabric craft known as oshie.

Aug
25
Sun
2019
Artist Talk by Keiko Takemiya @ Foyles Bookstore
Aug 25 @ 2:30 pm
Artist Talk by Keiko Takemiya @ Foyles Bookstore

Legendary manga artist Keiko Takemiya gives an exclusive talk this August!

Keiko Takemiya is arguably one of the most influential manga artists in Japan. Starting her career as an artist in late 1960 while still a teenager, her fame rapidly grew to stardom. This reached a new height in the 1970s when she became a seminal member of “the Fabulous Year 24 Group” – a new wave of female authors that revolutionised manga by developing new drawing techniques and introducing unconventional subject matters to the genre of girls’ manga, such as science fiction, fantasy, as well as boys’ love. Takemiya’s representative manga, The Poem of Wind and Trees (1977-80), which has sold nearly 5 million copies so far, is praised by critics and readers alike as a monumental work that laid the foundation for the rapidly growing genre of boys’ love within manga. In addition to her creative work, Takemiya has been a great advocate of preserving this nation-specific graphic art form as a cultural asset and was the first manga artist in Japan to be elected as President of an academic institution.
During this very special talk and in a rare appearance Takemiya, in conversation with comics historian Paul Gravett, will discuss her extensive career as one of Japan’s leading manga artists, and her inspirations behind iconic works such as To Terra… (1976-84) which shaped the precedent for female manga artists to create stories for a young male readership. Reflecting on the development of the narrative art form in Japan, she will also review what manga has meant to her and the society at large.

Image Credit: ©To Terra…, KeikoTAKEMIYA

This event is held in collaboration with Foyles Bookstore.