Japanese Events in London

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Oct
3
Thu
2019
Artist Talk: Naoya Inose in conversation with Dr Lena Fritsch @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Oct 3 all-day
Artist Talk: Naoya Inose in conversation with Dr Lena Fritsch @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

The artist Naoya Inose will discuss his work and exhibition The Post-Anthropocene with Dr Lena Fritsch, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Ashmolean Museum (University of Oxford).

The new geological era the Anthropocene, which means “the age of humanity”, defines the epoch we live in, and it is a time of significant human impact on Earth’s geology, ecosystem and climate. What kind of influence will humanity bring to this new geological age? Is the age of humanity in fact the history of time itself?

The main work in this exhibition, Ave Maria, depicts a Ferris wheel quietly enshrined in a huge cave. This Ferris wheel left by humans is a metaphor of humanity itself and it slowly rotates, climbing up and plunging down from top to bottom. Indeed, the Ferris wheel embodies the time constraints by which humanity is bound; it just constantly repeats its circular movement.

If life and death are the motif of the Ferris wheel, the Ferris wheel in the work Ave Maria has stopped, and time restrictions no longer exist. It has become an onlooker that quietly stares out of the cave. It is as if it is expecting slowly to become part of nature without being exposed to the sunshine.

IMAGE CREDITS: Himawari, 2019, Oil, acrylic on canvas, 30 x 65 cm, © Naoya Inose

Nara: sacred images from early Japan @ The British Museum, Room 3 and 93
Oct 3 – Nov 24 all-day
Bodhisattva of Compassion (Dream-changing Kannon), gilt bronze, AD late 600s – early 700s. Hōryūji temple, National Treasure. Photo by Sasaki Kyosuke, provided by Nara National Museum.

Bodhisattva of Compassion (Dream-changing Kannon), gilt bronze, AD late 600s – early 700s. Hōryūji temple, National Treasure. Photo by Sasaki Kyosuke, provided by Nara National Museum.

Nara, in the Yamato region of Japan, was the country’s capital from
AD 710–784 – and the cradle of traditional Japanese culture.

This special display runs in two rooms: the Asahi Shimbun Displays (Room 3) has treasures from Hōryūji, one of Japan’s oldest Buddhist temples, dating between the AD 600s and 700s. The Mitsubishi Corporation Japanese Galleries (Room 93) feature sacred sculptures and paintings from the great temples and shrines of Nara, from the AD 700s to the 1400s.

The Buddhist religion was introduced to Japan from China and Korea in the AD 500s, along with writing and new forms of government, transforming indigenous culture. For most of Japanese history, Buddhism has flourished alongside Shinto, native beliefs in kami (deities of nature and ancestors). In Nara, Shinto kami came to be regarded as emanations and protectors of Buddhist deities.

The Asahi Shimbun Displays Hōryūji, temple of the exalted law (Room 3)
The great temples and shrines (Room 93)

The Post-Anthropocene by Naoya Inose @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Oct 3 @ 9:30 am – Nov 1 @ 5:00 pm
The Post-Anthropocene by Naoya Inose @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation is delighted to introduce the London-based Japanese artist Naoya Inose to the UK public.

The new geological era the Anthropocene, which means “the age of humanity”, defines the epoch we live in, and it is a time of significant human impact on Earth’s geology, ecosystem and climate. What kind of influence will humanity bring to this new geological age? Is the age of humanity in fact the history of time itself?

The main work in this exhibition, Ave Maria, depicts a Ferris wheel quietly enshrined in a huge cave. This Ferris wheel left by humans is a metaphor of humanity itself and it slowly rotates, climbing up and plunging down from top to bottom. Indeed, the Ferris wheel embodies the time constraints by which humanity is bound; it just constantly repeats its circular movement.

If life and death are the motif of the Ferris wheel, the Ferris wheel in the work Ave Maria has stopped, and time restrictions no longer exist. It has become an onlooker that quietly stares out of the cave. It is as if it is expecting slowly to become part of nature without being exposed to the sunshine.

Private View: The Post-Anthropocene by Naoya Inose @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Oct 3 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Private View: The Post-Anthropocene by Naoya Inose @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

The Private View was a chance to have a first look at the exhibition The Post-Anthropocene by the London-based Japanese artist Naoya Inose.

The new geological era the Anthropocene, which means “the age of humanity”, defines the epoch we live in, and it is a time of significant human impact on Earth’s geology, ecosystem and climate. What kind of influence will humanity bring to this new geological age? Is the age of humanity in fact the history of time itself?

The main work in this exhibition, Ave Maria, depicts a Ferris wheel quietly enshrined in a huge cave. This Ferris wheel left by humans is a metaphor of humanity itself and it slowly rotates, climbing up and plunging down from top to bottom. Indeed, the Ferris wheel embodies the time constraints by which humanity is bound; it just constantly repeats its circular movement.

If life and death are the motif of the Ferris wheel, the Ferris wheel in the work Ave Maria has stopped, and time restrictions no longer exist. It has become an onlooker that quietly stares out of the cave. It is as if it is expecting slowly to become part of nature without being exposed to the sunshine.

MYM Presents: Okinawan Avant-Garde Night @ Richmix
Oct 3 @ 7:30 pm
MYM Presents: Okinawan Avant-Garde Night @ Richmix

AN EXCLUSIVE ONE-OFF CONTEMPORARY AND EXPERIMENTAL MUSIC AND DANCE PERFORMANCE FROM TRADITIONAL OKINAWA

MYM (Mutsumi, Yu and MINA) presents “Okinawan Avant-Garde Night”, an exclusive one-off music and dance performance with visuals and elements of storytelling at the crossroads of traditional Okinawan (Southern Japanese), contemporary and experimental music.

Punctuating their performance with the sound of the iconic Okinawan 3 string lute “sanshin”, Okinawan musician Mutsumi Aragaki (vocals, sanshin, electronics, audiovisual) and Japanese/Swiss musician MINA (vocals, sanshin, violin) each offer an avant-garde approach on ancient sounds and tales from the Southern Japanese island.

By blending songs, stories, images and movements together with Japanese performing artist Yu Tamura, this new collaboration invites the audience to discover the unique and rich culture of Okinawa with a highly artistic perspective.

Event details and tickets: https://richmix.org.uk/events/mym-presents-okinawan-avant-garde-night

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/364576844222056/

YUKA FUJII : LIKE PLANETS CINE-PHOTO (UK PREMIERE) @ CAFE OTO
Oct 3 @ 7:30 pm

CONFRONT RECORDINGS PRESENT: YUKA FUJII : LIKE PLANETS CINE-PHOTO (UK PREMIERE)

Tonights presentation celebrates the joint opening of an exhibition of photography by Yuka Fujii at the Pocko Gallery, together with the UK premiere of LIKE PLANETS, a film of images and text taken from the book of the same name. There will also be live music from Clive Bell and Rie Nakajima.

The film makes its world premiere at the Punkt Festival in Norway in September 2019 followed soon after by this London showing. There are plans to take it to Japan later in the year. LIKE PLANETS also features a specially commissioned soundtrack by Mark Wastell.

SET I
CLIVE BELL

SET II
LIKE PLANETS FILM

SET III
RIE NAKAJIMA

Oct
4
Fri
2019
Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival CARDIFF @ Chapter, Cardiff, Wales
Oct 4 – Oct 6 all-day

‘This year’s Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival starts at Chapter in Cardiff, on the 4th October, and we are hard at work organising everything to ensure that you will have a fantastic time. We are coordinating our marketplace to get the tables ready and preparing to welcome our special guests, Takeshi Yashiro and Satoshi Akutsu, who will be travelling from Japan to the UK to deliver their masterclass and animation workshop. Don’t miss out – book your tickets today.’

Oct
8
Tue
2019
Ley Line at Sadler’s Wells @ Sadler’s Wells Theatre, Lilian Baylis Studio
Oct 8 @ 7:15 pm

“Four striking works align, taking the audience on an exploration of reflection, purification, self and identity. Together we navigate an energetic path that illuminates the significance of our connection as human beings through unspoken word.

The Japan Foundation is delighted to partner with Fabula Collective on a contemporary dance production presented at Sadler’s Wells this October. A mixed bill performance choreographed by James Pett, Travis Clausen-Knight, and Japanese contemporary dance artist Kahiko Narisawa, the project emphasises the collaboration between Japanese and British dancers, bridging the cultures of the two countries and facilitating a meeting of minds to exchange skills, knowledge, technique and creative ideas.

The performance will be followed by a conversation between the dance artists and Sanjoy Roy, dance writer and critic for the Guardian.

Date:  8 October 2019, from 7:15pm
Venue: Sadler’s Wells Theatre, Lilian Baylis Studio

Roseberry Avenue, London EC1R 4TN
Nearest tube:
Angel Station

Oct
14
Mon
2019
The Japan Society Book Club @ The Japan Society
Oct 14 @ 7:00 pm

apan Society Book Club 2018Join us on the second Monday of each month for the Japan Society Book Club. The intention is simple: to explore the themes of the book, express personal opinions on the style and content, discuss how the book has changed (or not) in translation and to have a relaxed discussion with others who have similar interests.

There is no restriction on the nationality of the authors read, but books should be available in translation in both Japanese and English. The discussion is conducted mainly in English, but you can choose the language in which you read the book.

Visit the website to see which book will be the focus each month.

Booking Information

Please contact the Japan Society office on tel: 020 3075 1996 or email: events@japansociety.org.uk to book a place on any of our events. When emailing, please include the event title in the subject line.
Alternatively you can book online via our online booking form.

Oct
15
Tue
2019
Walk Cheerfully film screening @ The British Library
Oct 15 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Introduction by Bryony Dixon (BFI)
A screening of Japanese director Yasujiro Ozu’s silent gangster filmWalk Cheerfully with specially composed score by Japanese music specialist Clive Bell and renowned improviser Sylvia Hallett, performed live by the benshi Tomoko Komura.

The silent films screened in Japan from the 1920s to late 30s were never completely silent. Katsudo-shashin benshi, or benshi for short, were voice performers, who delivered live narration that provided everything an audience might need to appreciate a film by enacting characters in a theatrical manner (playing multiple roles with a variety of voices) while sitting or standing beside the movie screen.

Although known for the minimalism of his later work Ozu (Tokyo Story) had grown up devouring Hollywood movies. This is a delightful Tokyo spin on a classic gangster tale of Kenji (aka Ken the Knife) a thief who likes drinking and fighting. When he falls in love with sweet and simple Yazue, and she finds out what kind of man he really is, she leaves him ‘until he becomes an honest person’. But it is not easy to get rid of one’s past.

Kenji’s underworld adventures and doomed attempts at going straight accompanied here by expressive word, gesture and music, courtesy of benshi Tomoko Komura and musicians Clive Bell and Sylvia Hallett.

A panel discussion and Q&A led by Bryony Dixon will take place after the screening.

Details
Name: Walk Cheerfully film screening
Where:
Knowledge Centre
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London
NW1 2DB
When:
Tue 15 Oct 2019, 19:00 – 20:30
Price:
Full Price: £13.00
Member: £13.00
Senior 60+: £11.00
Student: £6.50
Registered Unemployed: £6.50
Disabled: £6.50
Under 18: £6.50
18-25: £6.50

Enquiries:
+44 (0)1937 546546
boxoffice@bl.uk