Japanese Events in London

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Feb
6
Tue
2018
21st Century Shinto Studies @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Feb 6 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
21st Century Shinto Studies @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation | England | United Kingdom

This event launches two books from the new Bloomsbury Shinto series (Series Editor: Fabio Rambelli, University of California, Santa Barbara): A Social History of the Ise Shrines: Divine Capital by Mark Teeuwen and John Breen, and Shinto, Nature and Ideology in Contemporary Japan: Making Sacred Forests by Aike Rots.

Mark Teeuwen will introduce the idea behind A Social History of the Ise Shrines and address the topic of “The ever-changing Ise Shrines: Studying Ise’s history through the lens of its agents.” John Breen will focus especially on the radical modern transformation of the Ise shrines in his talk, “The pleasures of pilgrimage in 19th century Japan.” In his presentation, “Ancient Sustainability? Ise Shrine, the Shikinen Sengū, and the Shinto Environmentalist Paradigm,” Aike Rots takes a critical look at the new Shinto discourse on nature and the environment, as it came to the fore at the start of the 21st century.

About the contributors

Mark Teeuwen is Professor of Japanese Studies at the University of Oslo. He has published widely on the history of Japanese religion, with a focus on Shinto. Recent publications by his hand include A Social History of the Ise Shrines (2017) and A New History of Shinto (2010), both co-authored with John Breen, and Formations of the Secular in Japan (Japan Review 30, special issue 2017), co-edited with Aike P. Rots. His main current book project investigates the social history of the Gion festival.

John Breen is professor at Nichibunken in Kyoto, Japan, where he edits the journal Japan Review. He previously taught at SOAS, University of London. John has written widely in English and in Japanese on the imperial institution and on aspects of Shinto. He is co-author (with Mark Teeuwen) of A Social History of the Ise Shrines: Divine capital, Bloomsbury, 2017 and of A new History of Shinto, Blackwell, 2011. He has also edited collections of essays on the Ise shrines and the Yasukuni shrine. His present topic concerns Emperor Meiji.

Aike P. Rots is an associate professor in contemporary Japan studies at the University of Oslo. He holds a PhD from the University of Oslo, an MA degree from SOAS, University of London, and BA degrees from Leiden University. He is the author of Shinto, Nature and Ideology in Contemporary Japan: Making Sacred Forests (Bloomsbury 2017) and the co-editor (with Mark Teeuwen) of Formations of the Secular in Japan (special issue of Japan Review, no. 30, 2017). He has written articles and book chapters on a variety of topics, including modern Shinto, sacred space, religion and politics in Vietnam, and Japanese Christianity.

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Daiwa Foundation Japan House
13/14 Cornwall Terrace (Outer Circle)
London NW1 4QP

Feb
15
Thu
2018
Private View: Setsuko Ono @ Daiwa Foundation Japan House
Feb 15 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Private View: Setsuko Ono @ Daiwa Foundation Japan House | England | United Kingdom

In 2018 Japanese artist Setsuko Ono will bring her work to London for the first time, with two consecutive solo exhibitions.

Ono creates steel sculptures characterised by their cut-out shapes, forming open and closed figures and designs. The cut-out silhouettes are bent in an animated way, while the cut-out negatives let sunlight and views of nature through. These delicate sculptures are created from sheets of steel welded by Ono herself.

Inspired by meeting her musical hero John Cage as a teenager, and watching his silent performance 4’33”, the artist works with little in the way of planning, detailed blueprints or preliminary drawings. Setsuko Ono’s recent work also includes mixed media paintings that reflect her interest in international politics.

Ono’s exhibition at the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation in February will be followed by a show at Asia House in March 2018. Both London exhibitions will include sculpture and mixed media paintings, and visitors will be able to use virtual reality goggles to experience Ono’s permanent installations in Japan – in Shinagawa, Tokyo, and at Hara Museum ARC in Shibukawa, Gunma Prefecture.

For all press enquiries and interview requests please contact Leighanne Murray at Midas PR.| leighanne.murray@midaspr.co.uk | 020 7361 7860

At the event, the artist will sign catalogues.

Exhibition dates: 16th February – 9th March 2018

Private View: Thursday 15th February 2018, 6-8pm

Artist Talk: Friday 23rd February 2018, 6pm

Booking required: http://dajf.org.uk/exhibitions/setsuko-ono/private-view-setsuko-ono

Image: Acropolis Down Under and Rising Moon, 2015, Steel © Setsuko Ono. Photo: Tom Petzwinkler

Address: Daiwa Foundation Japan House, 13/14 Cornwall Terrace (outer circle), Baker Street, London, NW1 4QP.

Feb
19
Mon
2018
LIV @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Feb 19 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
LIV @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation | England | United Kingdom

In this event, Roger Pulvers will speak about “LIV”, as well as his previous novel, “Star Sand”, and show parts of the film “Star Sand” that was released in Japan last year.

Liv Grimstad is riding on a suburban train in Sydney, Australia in 1975 when she takes notice of the old man sitting opposite her. Though his features are different, she recognizes that man by the piercing look in his cornflower-blue eyes. She is convinced it is Donald Meissner, the man who has haunted her memory since they both worked at the German Embassy in Tokyo during the war. He was the beast who tormented and persecuted people, sending them into the hands of the Japanese Military Police. She does not confront him at first but rather sets out on a journey of detective work to uncover this man.

“LIV” is a personal detective story and thrilling historical mystery set in Australia in 1975 and Tokyo in 1945. But it tells a universal tale about how the past bears on our present … and future.

By Roger Pulvers
Published by Balestier Press

More information on the book is available at https://www.balestier.com/books/literature/liv/

LIV will be on sale during the evening for £10 (RRP £13.99).

Roger Pulvers is an author, playwright, theatre director, and translator. He has published more than 50 books in Japanese and English, including novels, essays, plays, and poetry. Working as assistant to director Nagisa Oshima on “Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence” and befriending David Bowie brought him back to Japan and inspired him to become the award-winning playwright, film director and prolific author he is today. His most recent novel, Hoshizuna Monogatari (Star Sand), which he wrote in Japanese, was published by Kodansha, Japan’s largest publisher, in 2015 and subsequently in English and French in 2016 and 2017 respectively. It was released as a film, directed by him, in 2017.

Feb
27
Tue
2018
Hands of Goze: the Tactile Culture of Visually Impaired People in Modern Japan @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Feb 27 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Hands of Goze: the Tactile Culture of Visually Impaired People in Modern Japan @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation | England | United Kingdom

Goze is a term referring to visually-impaired female musicians who travelled Japan playing shamisen. After World War II, with the expansion of the welfare service for disabled people and the enhancement of education for visually impaired people, Goze came to be recognised as relics of the pre-modern times. With the passing of Haru Kobayashi (1900-2005), who was known as the “last Goze”, the culture of Goze, once maintained by visually-impaired people, disappeared from Japanese society in the 21st century. Is it right for Goze culture to be forgotten completely?

In this talk, Professor Kojiro Hirose will discuss “the hands of Goze” and approach the relevance and the possibility of Goze culture from three different angles: “touching the sound”, “touching the colour”, and “touching the heart”. Referencing Goze folk songs, which Goze created and spread as their own oral traditions, Professor Hirose will clarify the role that tactile culture of visually impaired people should play in today’s society.

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Daiwa Foundation Japan House
13/14 Cornwall Terrace (Outer Circle)
London NW1 4QP

Apr
12
Thu
2018
Georges Bigot and Japan, 1882-1899: Satirist, Illustrator and Artist Extraordinaire @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Apr 12 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Georges Bigot and Japan, 1882-1899: Satirist, Illustrator and Artist Extraordinaire @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation | England | United Kingdom

Incorporating over 250 illustrations, Georges Bigot and Japan is the first comprehensive study in English of French artist and caricaturist, Georges Ferdinand Bigot (1860-1927). Inspired by what he saw of Japanese culture and way of life at the Paris Exposition Universelle in 1878, Bigot went to Japan in 1882, immediately developing his career as an artist working in pen and ink, watercolours and oils. He also exploited his talent as a highly skilled sketch artist and cartoonist. His output was prodigious and included regular commissions from The Graphic and various Japanese as well as French journals. He left Japan in 1899, never to return. Bigot remains well known in Japan where examples of his cartoons still appear in Japanese textbooks, but he is barely known in France, his home country, or in Britain.

In this event, Sir Hugh Cortazzi will briefly introduce the volume, and Christian Polak will then give an illustrated talk about Bigot. The volume includes a full introduction of the life, work and artistry of Bigot by Polak, together with an essay by Sir Hugh on Charles Wirgman, publisher of Japan Punch. Wirgman was Bigot’s ‘predecessor’ and friend (he launched his own satirical magazine Tôbaé in 1887, the year Japan Punch closed).

Georges Bigot and Japan, 1882-1899: Satirist, Illustrator and Artist Extraordinaire will be on sale during the evening for £40 (RRP £95).

Free, booking essential.

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Daiwa Foundation Japan House
13/14 Cornwall Terrace (Outer Circle)
London NW1 4QP

Apr
26
Thu
2018
Human Rights in Japan: Freedom of Expression, the Media and the Constitutional Amendment @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Apr 26 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Human Rights in Japan: Freedom of Expression, the Media and the Constitutional Amendment @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation | England | United Kingdom

In April 2016, concluding his Japan Mission, the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression raised various concerns, warning of “serious threats to the independence of the press”. Dr Sanae Fujita has been closely engaged with the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression and the Special Rapporteur on the Right to Privacy. She informed and assisted their official statements to the Japanese Government in relation to the Bill on the Protection of Specially Designated Secrets (SDS) (2013) and the Anti-Conspiracy Bill (2015), and supported the UN mission to Japan.

In this talk, chaired by William Horsley, Dr Fujita will draw on her experiences to address how Japanese freedom of expression, including the independence of the media, has deteriorated under the current administration. She will also discuss the Government’s plans for constitutional amendment, which may have negative implications for human rights, and the Japanese Government’s response to the UN’s recommendations.

Free, booking essential.

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Daiwa Foundation Japan House
13/14 Cornwall Terrace (Outer Circle)
London NW1 4QP

Image © By permission of Sanae Fujita

May
10
Thu
2018
Private View: Double Method by Tokyo Rumando×Hideka Tonomura @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
May 10 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Private View: Double Method by Tokyo Rumando×Hideka Tonomura @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation | England | United Kingdom

Collaborating together for the first time, Tokyo Rumando and Hideka Tonomura are at the cutting edge of an exciting and groundbreaking generation of new photographers working in Japan today. Despite using very different methodologies, these two women photographers share the same interest in mapping intense psychological subjects to deconstruct the framework that links the past to the present.

Rumando works primarily through self-portraits , and has made several series of nudes, often using an experimental method involving montage. Relentlessly turning the camera on her self-image, Rumando provokes the emergence of an unforeseen “other side” from the depths of her own inner experience, while revealing and exploring connections between her own daily life and the labyrinthine underworld of Japanese “Love Hotels”.

Tonomura had committed to an unflinching account of both mundane and epic moments of her own life, exemplified by the staggering photographic record of her mother’s love affair, and intimate images of her own life working as a bar hostess. Tonomura’s work condenses and crystallises individual prosaic moments, often isolating them in contemplation on their implicit savagery and cruelty. Doing so, Tonomura uses her camera to capture and project an extreme and distorted vision of an uncontextualised, unhinged reality, highlighting the artist’s vengeful attitude towards herself.

Using photography to confront basic and instinctive key human issues, both Rumando and Tonomura continually reverse expectations and take their audiences into complex and moving interior spaces through their emotionally engaging practices.The two photographers participate in a fictitious dream, based on a shared optimism about the potential for art to transcend the problems of daily life.

Exhibition Dates:
11–28 May 2018, Monday–Friday 9.30am–5pm, Admission free

Artist Talk: Thursday 17 May 2018, 6pm
The artists will be joined in conversation by Dr Simon Baker, Director of the Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Paris.

About the contributors:

Tokyo Rumando (b. 1980, Tokyo) worked as surgical and psychiatric nurse, stripper and model for photographers, including Nobuyoshi Araki. She started using an instant camera as a teenager, using it to supplement her income as a dancer by selling to customers the polaroids taken during her shows. Based on her experiences modeling for movies and magazine, she started photographing herself in 2005. Her photography came to the public’s attention when her debut work Rest 3000~, Stay 5000~ was published by Zen Foto Gallery, Tokyo in 2012, followed by Orphee in 2014, and selfpolaroids in 2017, also by Zen Foto Gallery. Orphee was included in the group exhibition “Performing for the Camera” at Tate Modern in 2016. In the same year, Taka Ishii Gallery, Paris, France hosted Rumando’s first solo exhibition in Europe, I’m Only Happy When I’m Naked.
http://tokyorumando.sakura.ne.jp

Hideka Tonomura (b. Kobe, 1979) graduated from the Broadcasting and Filmmaking Department of Visual Arts Osaka, before starting her career as a photographer in 2002. Tonomura’ s major solo exhibitions include They Called Me Yukari / mama love (Zen Foto Gallery, Tokyo, 2013), mama love (trunk gallery 82, Seoul, 2011), Tonomura Hideka Shageki-0305- (Uplink, Tokyo, 2005), and Unlucky Family (Nikon Salon, Tokyo&Osaka, 2004). Her works have been part of several group exhibitions, including two consecutive editions of FOTOFEVER, Paris, France, in 2014 and 2015. Her photographs have been published in mama love (AKAAKA Art Publishing, 2008), They Called Me Yukari (Zen Foto Gallery, 2013) and orange elephant (Zen Foto Gallery, 2015).
www.hidekatonomura.com

Free, booking essential.

Images:
RIGHT: “orphee U3”, 2014, gelatin silver print © Tokyo Rumando
LEFT: “They called me Yukari #23”, 2012, gelatin silver print © Hideka Tonomura

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Daiwa Foundation Japan House
13/14 Cornwall Terrace (Outer Circle)
London NW1 4QP

May
17
Thu
2018
Artist Talk: Tokyo Rumando×Hideka Tonomura in conversation with Dr Simon Baker @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
May 17 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Artist Talk: Tokyo Rumando×Hideka Tonomura in conversation with Dr Simon Baker @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation | England | United Kingdom

Tokyo Rumando and Hideka Tonomura’s works depict two starkly contrasting types of reality. Rumando explores the reality of her own past inner life, while Tonomura radiates her own concept of reality on to the life surrounding her. Like doppelgängers, their artworks printed on paper are physical manifestations of the souls of the artists, and they blur the borders between the objective existence of the print and the inner souls of these photographers. For this event, the artists will be joined in conversation by Dr Simon Baker, Director of the Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Paris.

More info at :
http://dajf.org.uk/exhibitions/double-method-by-tokyo-rumandoxhideka-tonomura/artist-talk-tokyo-rumandoxhideka-tonomura-in-conversation-with-dr-simon-baker

Images:
ABOVE “Rest3000-Stay5000-No.25”, 2012, Gelatin silver print © Tokyo Rumando.
BELOW: “mama love #1”, 2008, Gelatin silver print© Hideka Tonomura

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Daiwa Foundation Japan House
13/14 Cornwall Terrace (Outer Circle)
London NW1 4QP

May
30
Wed
2018
21st Biennale of Sydney: Equilibrium and Engagement in this age of uncertainty @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
May 30 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
21st Biennale of Sydney: Equilibrium and Engagement in this age of uncertainty @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation | England | United Kingdom

The world seems to be becoming increasingly unequal and uncertain. This may partly be due to the discordant co-existence of varying interpretations of history, politics and belief systems. In this lecture, Mami Kataoka, artistic director of the current 21st Biennale of Sydney, will discuss works by artists participating in the Biennale in order to create an overview of a multi-layered society. Taking Sydney as a starting point, which she will consider as a microcosm of the world, Kataoka will look at overlapping perspectives surrounding ideas about nature, cosmic order, history and art history. These differing viewpoints also respond to the historical, architectural and conceptual specificities of the seven venues in Sydney in which they are displayed.

Image: Ai Weiwei Crystal Ball, 2017 crystal, life jackets 100 x 100 x 100 cm Installation view of the 21st Biennale of Sydney (2018) at Artspace. Photograph: Zan Wimberley Courtesy the artist and neugerriemschneider, Berlin

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Daiwa Foundation Japan House
13/14 Cornwall Terrace (Outer Circle)
London NW1 4QP

May
31
Thu
2018
Ageing and mental health: Pictures of being old in the UK and Japan @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
May 31 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Ageing and mental health: Pictures of being old in the UK and Japan @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

We are living in an era of ageing populations. Making connections with other people is said to promote the mental health and longevity of older people. In this seminar, Dr Shankar will address loneliness in older people living in England, some of the factors affecting loneliness in later life, and how loneliness is related to health and well-being.

As a super-ageing nation, Japan is in the front line when it comes to age-related problems. Mounting evidence suggests that isolation, often caused by the death of loved ones, triggers declining mental health. But some people – ‘hikikomori’ – choose to be isolated throughout their lives. Contrasting these two distinct cases of social isolation, Dr Cable will address possible factors contributing to the trend to increasingly poor mental health among older people in Japan, and its relevance to the UK.

About the contributors

Dr. Aparna Shankar is a Senior Lecturer at St George’s, University of London. She works on health and well-being in older adults, with a particular emphasis on the role of social isolation and loneliness, using data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing and other ageing cohorts. Other research interests include the patterning of health behaviours and the role of the environment on health and well-being.

Dr. Noriko Cable is a Senior Research Fellow at the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London. She works on social relationships, alcohol use and mental health from childhood to late adulthood as well as cross-national examinations of mental health. Her work appears in the booklets Life gets under your skin and Never too early, never too late published by her research group, the International Centre for Lifecourse Studies in Society and Health (ICLS). Dr Cable’s recent work has focussed on the question ‘What can the UK and Japan learn from each other to promote healthy ageing?’, which she discusses in Sleep Medicine (2017) and Gerontology (2018, Editor’s choice).

Free, booking essential.

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Daiwa Foundation Japan House
13/14 Cornwall Terrace (Outer Circle)
London NW1 4QP