Japan-related Events in London

Calendar submissions are very welcome! If you have a Japan-related event in London to add, just click the green ‘+ Post Your Event’ button at the top right of the calendar. It’s free & easy to do.

Jun
26
Tue
2018
New Approaches: #MeToo in Japan and the UK @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Jun 26 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
New Approaches: #MeToo in Japan and the UK @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

The #MeToo movement swiftly spread from America to the UK in October 2017, with thousands of women sharing their stories of sexual abuse or misconduct on social media. The movement’s impact spread beyond the internet, with prominent examples including allegations of sexual misconduct levelled at government figures, leading to the resignation of UK Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon, accusations of misconduct within the aid industry, and the President’s Club scandal.

Although initially slower to take off, the #MeToo movement has also gained momentum in Japan. The movement has given women a platform enabling their voices to be heard, leading to more women speaking out about sexual misconduct. As in the UK, members of the government have been implicated, most notably with the resignation of Junichi Fukuda, the top bureaucrat at the Ministry of Finance, after he was accused of sexual harassment by a journalist.

In this seminar, the impact of #MeToo will be discussed in relation to the UK and Japan. The speakers will outline the implications and effects the movement has had across each society and the extent to which it may impact government policies and legislation, as well as the challenges that the movement faces.

About the contributors

Sophie Walker
Sophie Walker is Leader of the Women’s Equality Party, Britain’s first feminist political party which campaigns for women’s rights. In 2016 she ran for London Mayor on a manifesto to close the city’s 23% pay gap and lack of affordable childcare, winning 1 in every 20 votes cast. In 2017 she contested the seat of the ‘men’s rights activist’ MP Philip Davies after he filibustered a bill to end violence against women and girls, and helped to halve his constituency majority. Sophie recently won 90% of the vote in the Party’s first leadership election. Previously a Reuters correspondent for 20 years, Sophie came to politics via disability campaigning and activism and is an ambassador for the National Autistic Society and for IncludeMEtoo.

Asako Osaki
Asako Osaki, Visiting Professor at Kwansei Gakuin University, School of Policy Studies, is a specialist in gender issues. She began her career at the United Nations Development Programme, focusing on the promotion of gender equality and women’s empowerment. Since returning to Tokyo, she has been active in mainstreaming gender in Japan’s development assistance policies and programmes, as well as in addressing domestic gender issues such as poverty and violence, working with the Government, NGOs and research institutions. At the APEC Women and Economy forum 2014, Osaki presented on the “Economic Empowerment of Women in the Post-Disaster Reconstruction Process”. She also participated in the 2016 W20 (G20 Women’s Forum) as part of the Government of Japan’s official delegation.

Shiori Ito
Shiori Ito is a freelance journalist, documentary film-maker and author of Black Box (2017). Her work is mainly distributed overseas, and has been shown on international media outlets such as Al Jazeera and Reuters. At the 2018 New York Festivals, an international media competition, Ito won two silver medals in the Social Issues and Sports Documentary categories. She also won the 7th Free Press Association Award Grand Prize in Japan for Black Box. This book is about her own investigation and experience of Japan’s sexual violence situation. Ito is currently working on a BBC documentary about sexual violence in Japan.

Dan Damon
Dan Damon (Chair) is a BBC journalist and radio broadcaster who presents World Update for the BBC World Service. Damon joined the BBC in 1974 as a technical operator for radio news. His move into journalism took place in 1982 with a nightly phone-in on LBC. In 1988, he moved to Hungary with his camerawoman wife, Siân, to report on liberation and street protest in East Germany, Czechoslovakia, Romania, Albania and the former Soviet Union. Damon also reported from conflicts in Croatia and Bosnia, Baghdad during the first Gulf War, and Afghanistan. He then returned to the BBC in 1995 to work as a presenter and reporter for the BBC World Service and BBC Radio 4. In 2003 Damon became the main presenter of World Update on the BBC World Service.

Organised by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
13/14 Cornwall Terrace, Outer Circle (entrance facing Regent’s Park), London NW1 4QP

Free, booking essential.

Jun
27
Wed
2018
Closing the gender gap by 2030: Lessons from Japan and the UK @ Thai Theatre, New Academic Building, London School of Economics, London, WC2A 3LJ
Jun 27 @ 6:30 pm
Closing the gender gap by 2030: Lessons from Japan and the UK

Closing the gender gap by 2030: Lessons from Japan and the UK

Admission free, Booking essential

Despite the Japanese government’s commitment to creating a “society where all women shine”, progress in achieving this is still limited.  In 2017, Japan dropped to 114th place on the Global Gender Gap Index produced by the World Economic Forum, evidencing the magnitude of the problem in this country.  Whilst the UK was ranked 15th, there are still several areas in which the country still performs poorly, such as the gender pay gap.  In this seminar, gender advisors to governments in both Japan and the UK will discuss the current status of the gender gap in each country, what policies and programmes have been implemented, what challenges still exist and future recommendations.  A policy analyst from the OECD will then present a wider perspective of the gender gap situation in OECD countries and their tendencies.

The event is organised in cooperation with the Department of Law, LSE and will take place at the Thai Theatre, New Academic Building, London School of Economics.

Jun
28
Thu
2018
Women’s Economic Empowerment in Post-Disaster Reconstruction: a study of Tohoku @ Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre
Jun 28 @ 6:00 pm – 7:45 pm
Women’s Economic Empowerment in Post-Disaster Reconstruction: a study of Tohoku @ Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre

On March 11 2011, a 9.0 magnitude earthquake hit the north-east coast of Japan, causing a massive tsunami. The scale of the damage was unprecedented. One of the key reconstruction activities has been supporting women’s economic empowerment. After disasters, women play a vital role in rehabilitating the household and the community, which is one strategic approach in post-disaster recovery and reconstruction efforts.
In this talk, Professor Asako Osaki, Visiting Professor at Kwansei Gakuin University, School of Policy Studies, and specialist on gender issue, will talk about good practices of economic empowerment of women in post-disaster reconstruction in Tohoku, Japan.
Daniel Morchain, Global Adviser on Climate Change Adaptation at OXFAM, who happened to be in Tokyo on March 11, 2011, will then present a wider perspective of climate adaptation and economic empowerment for vulnerable and marginalised communities and groups living in climate hotspots.

The event is organised in cooperation with the Institute for Risk & Disaster Reduction (IRDR) Centre for Gender and Disaster, UCL, and will be held at the Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre, University College London.
A map of the campus is available here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/maps/gustave-tuck-lt

Free, booking essential.

Jul
3
Tue
2018
The Power of Calligraphy @ Daiwa Foundation Japan House
Jul 3 @ 11:00 am

Misuzu Kosaka calligraphy at DaiwaFree event; booking essential

The calligrapher and artist Misuzu Kosaka has produced striking, highly original art works that have been incorporated into book designs, restaurant decors and commemorated major events. In this event, her calligraphy works will be introduced and interpreted by the critic Damian Flanagan. Misuzu will then give a demonstration of her dynamic calligraphy in action and invite participants to pick up a brush, splash the ink and attempt to create their own beautiful calligraphy.

Misuzu Kosaka

Misuzu Kosaka, a Tottori native and daughter of a poetry-loving Shinto priest, studied under Saisui Ishibashi, a kanji calligraphy master, and Yuri Sato, a kana calligraphy master. Today she is a director and instructor at the Calligraphy Education Society of Japan.  Misuzu has pioneered innovative ways of using calligraphy in modern artworks through solo exhibitions, charity exhibitions and by presiding over her own workshop.

http://www.misuzu-ism.com/

Damian Flanagan

Damian Flanagan is an award-winning author and translator who has published a number of books on Japanese literature. He has also written widely on Japanese politics, arts and society for publications including The Japan Times, the Asahi ShinbunNewsweek and the Nihon Keizai ShinbunYukio Mishima is his latest book, published in October 2014.  He lives in Manchester and Nishinomiya, Japan.

http://dajf.org.uk/event/the-power-of-calligraphy

Jul
26
Thu
2018
The Women of Ishikawa @ Daiwa Foundation Japan House
Jul 26 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
The Women of Ishikawa

The Women of Ishikawa

Be drawn into the faraway world of The Women of Ishikawa.  It is a selection of strange, hilarious, and tragic folk stories from the mountains of Ishikawa, brought over from Japan and performed by Doubtful Sound. The show is in a mix of Kaga-ben (the local dialect) and English, and the stories are sprinkled with traditional folk songs from the SOAS Min’yo Group.  The tales performed in Japanese have English subtitles.

The performance at the Daiwa Foundation includes a ghost who nurses babies, girls falling asleep on the shoulder of a monk, a collapsing cave, a mochi-fight, a potato digger, uncomfortably welcoming guests, a snake swordsmith, the queen of thieves, a lord who tells terrible jokes, an elderly lady under the floor, a young woman murdered by the sun, and a basket of bees.  The show will include a Q&A session, providing a chance to ask the director, dramaturg, and musicians about the tales and songs.

About the contributors
Doubtful Sound
Doubtful Sound is a bilingual theatre company who research, translate, and perform traditional stories and folktales from far flung areas of Japan. The group was formed in Tokyo in 2012 and have since performed the tales in ancient temples, Japanese gardens, pubs, over rivers, at festivals, and occasionally in theatres. Scenes are performed in Japanese and English with the Japanese scenes often in the local dialect of the area.
SOAS Min’yo Group 
The SOAS Min’yo Group are a largely amateur bunch of Japanese folk song (min’yo) devotees who meet regularly at SOAS, University of London, to practice singing, instruments and some dancing. Launched in 2012 by David Hughes, a Japanese music specialist at SOAS, its members are of various nationalities, including Japanese. The Group have performed at many events around the UK and abroad.

For further information, see www.facebook.com/SOASMinyo, or email David at dh6@soas.ac.uk.

Oct
3
Wed
2018
New Approaches to Ainu Contemporary Art @ Daiwa Foundation Japan House
Oct 3 @ 6:00 pm
New Approaches to Ainu Art

New Approaches to Ainu Art

Despite facing discrimination and prejudice in Japan, the indigenous Ainu people have maintained their own culture and art. The Ainu have developed their art through their everyday life and it has its own unique value and beauty. Surprisingly, Ainu art has been largely ignored in Japan but has received attention in other countries such as the UK.

In this seminar, Toru Kaizawa, an Ainu artist, will talk about his passion for Ainu contemporary art and about his work which will be displayed at the British Museum from September 2018. Professor Nicole Coolidge Rousmaniere will explain why she values Ainu contemporary art and how Ainu traditional art still exists in modern life. Professor Simon Kaner will then explore the beauty of Ainu art from a historical perspective.

This seminar aims to raise awareness of Ainu contemporary art and has been organised in collaboration with various institutions, including Hokkaido University and the Sainsbury Institute.

Nov
6
Tue
2018
Private View: Jailhouse Locke by Tsuyoshi Anzai @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Nov 6 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Private View: Jailhouse Locke by Tsuyoshi Anzai @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

The works presented in Tsuyoshi Anzai’s first solo exhibition in the UK pose questions about the ‘thereness’ of everyday items.
Taking inspiration from the Platonic philosophical assumption of a world of ideas which is hidden from human senses, Anzai attempts to disrupt the way we unconsciously and passively perceive “representation”, by creating a state where the object is suspended somewhere between reality and illusion.

In the series of works ‘distance’ (2016- ), a device invented by Anzai, called ‘New Video Player’, enables viewers to see an object as an illusory video image, although the object is in fact in front of them. Using the mechanism of a camera obscura, this box-like device projects an image of 3D objects onto a screen through a lens. The device produces moving images in a way that is completely different from conventional video-recording devices, since the subject itself, namely the kinetic sculpture, is moving inside the device.
Etymologically referring to the ancient Greek word kinesis (motion), kinetics started being applied to art at the end of the 19th century, by impressionist artists seeking a more rounded representation of the human figure through the use of perspective. In the 20th century, the concept of movement was then applied to objects and three dimensional works.

Intending to put under scrutiny the dualism between representation and interpretation, in the paintings ‘TBD’, inspired by everyday items, Anzai removes the illustrated objects from any context and leaves the viewer free to focus on their pure form.

The chasm between the objective and the subjective also inspired the title of the exhibition, where the term “Jailhouse” alludes to the prisoners of Plato’s Cave, and “Locke” refers to the philosopher John Locke, one of the founders of Empiricism, a philosophical movement which asserts that our knowledge can be acquired only from what we perceive through our senses.
Additionally, the title contains a veiled pun, referencing the Jailhouse Rock song by Elvis Priestley. As with the rocker’ famous dance moves, the movements of Anzai’s kinetic sculptures capture the viewer with their impermanent choreographies.

Breaking free of what the artist defines as the “modern disease of the subject/object distinction created by Descartes”, Anzai’s works challenge the visitors to look beyond simplifications and into the intertwined complexities of our modern world.

Image: distance #003-5, 2017, Installation View at the Pohang Museum of Steel Art, Pohang, South Korea © Tsuyoshi Anzai

Address:
Daiwa Foundation Japan House
13/14 Cornwall Terrace
London NW1 4QP
Nearest Tube: Baker Street

Nov
15
Thu
2018
Tsuyoshi Anzai in conversation with Dr Dean Kenning @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Nov 15 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Tsuyoshi Anzai in conversation with Dr Dean Kenning @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

Event part of the exhibition: Jailhouse Locke by Tsuyoshi Anzai
7 November-5 December 2018, Monday–Friday 9.30am–5pm, Admission free

Private View: Tuesday 6 November 2018, 6-8pm Admission free, booking essential

On the occasion of his artist talk, Tsuyoshi Anzai will discuss his ‘Jailhouse Locke’ exhibition with Dr Dean Kenning, Lecturer at Central Saint Martins and Research Fellow at Kingston School of Art.
Anzai’s works pose questions about the “thereness” of everyday items; the title of the show takes inspiration from a wide range of philosophical ideas- most importantly, the prisoners of Plato’s Cave and the founder of empiricism John Locke- that prompted Anzai to investigate and disrupt the way we unconsciously and passively perceive “representation”.
For example, in the series of works ‘distance’ (2016- ), Anzai created a devices that, using the mechanism of a camera obscura, enables viewers to see an object as an illusory video image, although the object is in fact in front of them. The artist’s intention, to put under scrutiny the dualism between representation and interpretation, is also explored in the paintings ‘TBD’, where Anzai removes the illustrated objects from any context, leaving the viewer free to focus on their pure form.
During the talk, the artist will present his creative process, and how he started building simple-structured machines with unusual combinations of everyday items, with the intent of redefining the connection between their form/purpose when they are used as components of machines.
Breaking free of what the artist defines as the “modern disease of the subject/object distinction created by Descartes”, Anzai’s works challenge the visitors to look beyond simplifications and into the intertwined complexities of our modern world.
Speakers:

Tsuyoshi Anzai (b.1987) specializes in kinetic art and video. He creates simple-structured machines by making impromptu combinations of everyday items, exploring the relationships between humans and objects. He received a Bachelor in Music in 2009 and a Master in Film and New Media in 2011, both from Tokyo University of the Arts. He participated in the artist residency program at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston from 2015 to 2017. Anzai has had several solo exhibitions, including Shadows Cast Shadows (2018), Plaza North, Saitama, Japan; Origins Originated from Originative Originals (2014), Chimera-Project, Budapest, Hungary. Anzai’s work has also been included in group shows in Korea, United States and in his native Japan, for example at the Kawasaki City Museum.
Anzai won a Bursary Award from the Royal Society of Sculptors in 2015.

Dr Dean Kenning is an artist and writer. Dean is currently Research Fellow at Kingston School of Art and teaches Fine Art at Central St Martins. He is also a member of the Capital Drawing Group and the Social Morphology Research Unit. Dean’s artworks range from kinetic sculptures to videos and diagrams, often employing DIY and autodidactic methods and modes of representation to express compulsive states and to explore political and philosophical material. His most recent solo exhibition was at Piper Keys (2018) and he has exhibited internationally in group shows including at the ICA (2015), Greene Naftali (2017) and BAK (2013). He has also published articles in journals such as Third Text, Art Monthly and Mute, including on the politics of art and art education.

Image: distance, 2018, Installation View from “Shadows Cast Shadows”, Plaza North, Saitama, Japan
© Tsuyoshi Anzai

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Daiwa Foundation Japan House
13/14 Cornwall Terrace (Outer Circle)
London NW1 4QP

Nov
17
Sat
2018
Experience Japan Exhibition 2018 @ The Royal Society London
Nov 17 all-day
Experience Japan Exhibition 2018 @ The Royal Society London | England | United Kingdom

The Experience Japan Exhibition aims to introduce the growing range of study and research opportunities available in Japan.

This year,12 Japanese education institutions and several Japan-related organisations will be attending to provide information on degree programmes taught entirely in English, as well as on the research opportunities, summer courses and other options open to international students. There will also be a chance to find out about the variety of scholarships and research funding available to enable you to take advantage of these learning opportunities.

This year’s line-up of seminars will cover the basics about local life, as well as allow you to hear directly from individuals who have experienced studying or conducting research in Japan. Guest speakers will be delivering presentations that provide insights into Japanese language, as well as showcasing Japanese innovation. There will also be a special seminar on the ever-popular Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Programme.

So come along and find your way to Japan – the experience of a lifetime awaits!

Online registration is recommended but not required. Pre-register via the link below to receive a special gift on the day of the exhibition.

Experience Japan Exhibition Website
http://www.experience-japan.jp/

Apr
17
Wed
2019
JIZAI by Haruo Mitsuta @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation
Apr 17 @ 9:30 am – May 14 @ 5:00 pm
JIZAI by Haruo Mitsuta @ Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation is delighted to introduce the unique works of the acclaimed Japanese artist Haruo Mitsuta to the UK public.

Mitsuta is the only contemporary artist who makes Jizai Okimono (“articulated animals”) – flexible animal figures made from metal pieces, which can replicate the movements of the original animals. Originally they were made by armourers in the late Edo and the Meiji period.

Jizai Okimono have gained some recognition within Japan in recent years, but still belong to a very minor area of traditional Japanese metallic handicrafts. The vast majority of these items were sold abroad, so this exceptional form of art never had the chance to develop its roots within Japan, where it originated. Its presence may have been long lost in the Japanese art scene, but these objects have been collected and cherished by many people outside Japan.

Mitsuta will be showcasing some of his most impressive and startlingly realistic pieces in this exhibition.